Volume 3, Issue 6, December 2017, Page: 80-86
Travelers Impact and Consequences of Digitally Connected or Disconnected in Indian Tourism
Srishti Upadhyay, Department of Rural Management, School of Management Studies, Baba Saheb Bhirao Ambedkar University, Lucknow, India
Abhishek Mishra, Department of Rural Management, School of Management Studies, Baba Saheb Bhirao Ambedkar University, Lucknow, India
Received: Sep. 9, 2017;       Accepted: Sep. 21, 2017;       Published: Nov. 8, 2017
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijmfs.20170306.11      View  1751      Downloads  67
Abstract
Technological progress and tourism have worked in the wheel for several years. the property is that the vehicle that drove the goal of technologically increased tourism experiences forward. This study, through AN beta qualitative analysis identifies the factors that boost and/or distract travelers from getting a digitally increased tourism expertise. Four factors will boost and/or distract travelers from being connected: (1) hardware and package, (2) wants and contexts, (3) openness to usage, and (4) provide and provision of property. The analysis conjointly analyses the positive and/or negative consequences that arise from being connected or disconnected. A Connected/Disconnected Consequences Model illustrates 5 varieties of positive and/or negative consequences: (1) handiness, (2) communication, (3) info obtainability, (4) time consumption, and (5) supporting experiences. a much better understanding of the role and consequence of property throughout the trip will enhance mortal expertise.
Keywords
Technology, Connectivity - During-Trip Stage, Unplugging - Selective, Unplugging - Social Wi-Fi
To cite this article
Srishti Upadhyay, Abhishek Mishra, Travelers Impact and Consequences of Digitally Connected or Disconnected in Indian Tourism, International Journal of Management and Fuzzy Systems. Vol. 3, No. 6, 2017, pp. 80-86. doi: 10.11648/j.ijmfs.20170306.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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